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How Kolcraft grew by making parents sit in baby strollers?

How do you make a decision to buy a couch? By sitting on it. Right? Checking whether it’s comfortable enough and it’ll go perfectly with the background of your living room.

So why would you purchase a stroller for your child without knowing whether they would feel comfortable sitting in it? We know that babies of that age are still in the process of learning to speak, but at such a young age, they deserve the best. Don’t they?


Kolcraft is a third-generation, family-owned company in the US that has been known for creating innovative and safe baby products for more than 70 years.


Well, we know that most of the strollers are just a tad bit too small for your adult behind — but Kolcraft clearly thinks that’s no excuse and came up with a perfect solution for it. 



So what innovative idea Kolcraft found this time?


Back in 2016, Kolcraft created an adult-size version of their Contours Bliss stroller so potential buyers can make a more informed buying decision. 


They created the test ride so adults could experience first-hand how each Contours Stroller is carefully designed keeping baby’s joy and comfort in mind.


Now you must be wondering how big is the stroller? How can it fit your adult body and how will it gauge the comfort for your child? Check out the below video to how parents can feel their baby’s strollers.



Well, the test drive is more than twice the size of their standard baby design at 7 feet and 6 inches high, 6 feet deep, and 4 feet wide. 


Every new parent probably wishes someone would come along and push them around in a stroller for a change. A few lucky moms and dads got to live that fantasy and give their feet a rest, thanks to an adult-sized test stroller from manufacturer Kolcraft. Such was the simplicity behind the messaging and customer experience strategy of Kolcraft.


This whole new level of customer experience and ensuring the best product for the consumers got people talking and sharing. For the first time ever, parents could experience what their baby experiences, proving just how comfortable Contours strollers are for babies.



Source:dandaad.org

The Impact of an inexpensive yet powerful innovative Idea by Kolcraft


Video of parents going for a ride earned 53 million views in less than a month, and nearly 50 million shoppers shared content over Twitter.


This joined PR-like highlights on “The Today Show” and “Good Morning America,” posts on mom blogs and mom forums, and write-ups online with PopSugar, Essential Baby and Good Housekeeping, which directed traffic to the brand’s website. The buzz helped score a Google search trend for the term “Adult Stroller” that saw 40% more searches than “Contours Strollers.”


Contours saw a 26-point increase in “share of shoppers talking about the product,” which resulted in a 225% increase in website traffic, nearly 480 million total impressions across all activity, and a 15% lift in sales per store per week vs. the previous year.



Did Parents love this concept by Kolcraft? Absolutely!!

Contours intercepted parents in stores to film parents testing out the massive stroller and shared the content on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and other social media apps in order to educate the customer about the product in a humorous manner.


According to Kolcraft, nearly 40% of stroller shoppers perform online research before visiting a store. Additionally, new parents trust their own network more with parents being five times more likely to use Facebook for recommendations than parenting websites.


There are more than 16 million parents of infants in the U.S., and the BuyBuy Baby store covets this market, knowing they also visit two to three mass or specialty stores to buy a stroller. Contours in this segment made a huge impact for a smaller retailer. They only had enough budget for that, coupled with a small pre-store social budget, and became a massive hit.

Innovation has nothing to do with how many R & D dollars you have. When Apple came up with the Mac, IBM was spending at least 100 times more on R & D. It’s not about money. Steve Jobs